Category Archives: memory lane

2002/12/03

Needless to say, the unreliable narrator has become a much more familiar convention to me, but I still admire the way that Ishiguro explores the layers of self-deception we use to protect ourselves.
[When We Were Orphans, by Kazuo Ishiguro]
What’s cool and disturbing about Ishiguro’s When We Were Orphans (another book, which I read during the [...]

2002/12/01

I didn’t understand feminism in high school and found it irritating. Much has changed since then, of course. It’s odd because despite my seemingly negative reaction to Byatt here, Possession won its place in my memory as one of my favorite books in contemporary literature. I also find my “critique” of contemporary [...]

2002/11/08

I took a course on Bach in my last semester of college because of this book.
[Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, by Douglas Hofstadter]
By the way, there was another really clever dialogue in the GEB, which I read on Wednesday. It was titled, “A Little Harmonic Labyrinth,” which was a Bach composition that modulated [...]

2002/10/11

The inspiration for the subtitle of this blog.
[Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, by Douglas Hofstadter]
A few days ago, I succumbed to temptation and opened up Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, by Douglas Hofstadter. It is one of the most absolutely amazing books I have ever read. Very difficult to follow though [...]

2002/08/21

Not sure if this interpretation of Camus is correct. Sartre, in any case, would not have approved.
[The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays by Albert Camus (trans. Justin O'Brien)]
But when I realized this, that I’d be liberated if I knew that I had to die in the next few weeks, I suddenly understood what [...]

2002/08/12

For the record, I still think Camus’ solution to the absurd is a cop-out.
[The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays by Albert Camus (trans. Justin O'Brien)]
So if any of you were waiting breathlessly to see how Camus would affirm life when one lives in the condition of the absurd, expect to be disappointed. Basically, he [...]

2002/08/08

Having acquired more critical thinking skills over the course of my college education, I don’t think I’d profess a belief in any sort of “magic” now. Nor do I reify human consciousness anymore (which had been a product of my Platonist tendencies). It’s very fashionable in science these days to call consciousness an [...]

2002/08/06

Well, I suppose I can provide an explanation of phenomenonology now, albeit not a concise one. There has been some progress in my education in the past five years.
[The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays by Albert Camus (trans. Justin O'Brien)]
Camus has now discussed how the phenomenologists end up escaping the absurd in a [...]

2002/08/05

It still makes me wince to realize how patronizing I sounded at almost-seventeen. I wonder if I would understand Camus better now if I were to read the essay again.
[The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays by Albert Camus (trans. Justin O'Brien)]
I am still in the middle of The Myth of Sisyphus, by [...]

A new endpoint

In the interests of consolidation, I will be reposting entries concerning books from my LiveJournal under the category “memory lane”. For those of you who have already read these entries, I apologize for the repetition.