Category Archives: book log

George R.R. Martin, Jim Grimsley, Lynne Truss

A Storm of Swords, by George R.R. Martin: Finished this book during the summer, but forgot to add it to the reading log. I have to admit, for about the first half of the book, I was getting sick of the story. At one point, I was feeling particularly upset because the only characters I [...]

Mary Renault

The King Must Die, by Mary Renault: Reading Mary Renault always tempts me to become a classics or history concentrator. Mostly because it reminds me of the whole glamour of research: to be able to extrapolate an entire world from the fragments collected from crumbling, forgotten books and texts sitting neatly lined up on shelves [...]

A.S. Byatt, Margaret Atwood, Lois McMaster Bujold, Kazuo Ishiguro, Douglas Adams, Laurie R. King, Orson Scott Card, George R.R. Martin

Ahem. So you see, lately I’ve discovered that while Widener may not be the perfect library that contains all the books that have ever been published, it still has an impressive contemporary fiction collection. Ah, Hollis, how I love thee. In any case, I’m still prepared to believe that Widener has very nearly all books [...]

Ellen Kushner, Terry Pratchett, Dorothy L. Sayers

Swordspoint, by Ellen Kushner: I bought this book on the recommendation of my best friend, despite my initial qualms about her plot summary—she described it as a medieval story about a swordsman and a scholar (I thought hopefully of Narcissus und Goldmund and less optimistically of Mercedes Lackey’s numerous swords-and-sworcery novels). Still, I wanted to [...]

Mark Haddon, Alexander McCall Smith, George R.R. Martin, Phillip K. Dick, Dorothy L. Sayers

I plan to keep this update brief. Five books are a lot to cover in one blog entry, after all.
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, by Mark Haddon: I read a review of this book when it came out in hardcover, a little over a year ago, and have been meaning to [...]

Diana Wynne Jones

The Merlin Conspiracy, by Diana Wynne Jones: The themes that repeat in DWJ’s fiction—many worlds, time travel, memory—are all present here, but in yet another new and original permutation. I’m always amazed by how many worlds she invents and how no two of them are ever alike. The Merlin Conspiracy isn’t the most evenly structured [...]

Karen Jay Fowler, Terry Pratchett

It’s lonely being in Cambridge during the summer, when your friends are all back home in New York (or other places). Lab work is exciting, even when all I’m doing is pipetting isopropanol back and forth, but once I step outside the CGR building, a crushing sense of being entirely self-contained in my own consciousness, [...]