Category Archives: book log

Helen Fielding, Arturo Pérez-Reverte (trans. Sonia Soto), Stendhal (trans. Richard Howard), Patricia C. Wrede & Caroline Stevermer, Kate Ross, Diana Wynne Jones

The following books were read from January to March 2006.
Bridget Jones’s Diary, by Helen Fielding: I’ve seen Bridget Jones referenced obliquely so many times—in magazine articles, in the Very Secret Diaries, in passing conversations—that reading the actual book was somewhat of an anticlimax. I suppose it also didn’t help that I had watched the movie [...]

Kate Ross, Ursula K. Le Guin, Umberto Eco (trans. William Weaver), Italo Calvino (trans. William Weaver)

The following books were read in December 2005.
Cut to the Quick, by Kate Ross: The first of the Julian Kestrel mysteries featuring a Regency dandy as the detective. When you hear such a premise, the sort of protagonist brought to mind is a flippant, well-dressed wit whose trivial façade hides a sharp intellect. In a [...]

Terry Pratchett, Neil Gaiman, Haruki Murakami (trans. Philip Gabriel), Dorothy L. Sayers

I haven’t updated this blog since last October, due to considerable laziness on my part. But that doesn’t mean I’ve abandoned it, and I shall try my best over the next few days to catch up on the backlog. In this post, some notes on the books I read from October to November [...]

Terry Pratchett, Steven Brust, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Haruki Murakami (trans. Philip Gabriel), Dorothy L. Sayers, Neal Stephenson

Going Postal, by Terry Pratchett: Another Ankh-Morpork novel along the lines of The Truth, i.e. a look into the chaos that explodes when the Discworld equivalent of a modern-day convenience develops. Vetinari at his absolute best here. There’s definitely a gentle parody of that 50s film stereotype of the con man who ends [...]

J.K. Rowling, Haruki Murakami (trans. Jay Rubin), Dorothy L. Sayers, Steven Brust

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, by J.K. Rowling: I bet it’s still not safe to post spoilers. What I will say is that The Half-Blood Prince has replaced The Prisoner of Azkaban as my favorite in the series. I’m sure some people will violently disagree with me (especially due to the, er, [...]

Robert Graves, Orson Scott Card, Anne Bishop, Steven Brust, Patricia C. Wrede & Caroline Stevermer, Jean Webster, Dorothy L. Sayers

I finished these books last month. My reactions have muted with time, so I’ll try to note down quickly my most memorable impressions.
Claudius the God, by Robert Graves: I’ve been meaning to read Claudius the God ever since I finished I, Claudius two years ago, and finally I’ve gotten around to borrowing it from Lamont. [...]

Mercedes Lackey, Louis Cha (trans. John Minford), G.K. Chesterton, Jasper Fforde

The Fairy Godmother, by Mercedes Lackey: What is there to say? It’s exactly what one expects from Lackey, complete with empowered female protagonist and all. It “overthrows” romance novel conventions in such a predictable way that nothing about the plot is unusual or surprising. Lackey does her best to make her [...]

Steven Brust

The following books were read from March to May of this year:
Taltos, by Steven Brust: The first book in the Vlad series, chronologically-speaking, and tells how Vlad meets Morrolan, Sethra Lavode, and Aliera. Also explains how he got Spellbreaker. I’ve noticed that Brust varies his narrative technique for each Vlad novel, and in Taltos, he [...]

Jim Grimsley, Dorothy L. Sayers, Susanna Clarke

The following books were read from late January to March of this year.
Comfort and Joy, by Jim Grimsley: My friend lent me this sequel to Winter Birds after I finished the first two Grimsley books, and despite the lack of novel narrative devices, I think I preferred this novel to its prequel. That being said, [...]

Ilyon (trans. Tae-Hung Ha), Steven Brust

Samguk Yusa: Legends and History of the Three Kingdoms of Ancient Korea, by Ilyon (trans. Tae-Hung Ha): I was in Yenching, looking for books on Yi Sunsin, the famous Korean admiral who nearly single-handedly led the Korean navies to victory against Hideyoshi’s invasion, when I came across this translation of Samguk Yusa, written by the [...]